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Archive of "News" Category

Dan Raemer & Janice Palaganas Present the Big Dilemmas of IPE

 

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Dan Raemer and Janice Palaganas will be presenting the closing keynote speech at the Spring Simulation User Network (SUN) Conference in San Diego, California. The SUN Conference takes place from April 18 through April 20. Dan and Janice’s presentation is entitled, “Dueling Synapses: Dilemmas in Simulation-Enhanced Interprofessional Education.”

 

If you enjoy the dynamic duo of Dr. Raemer and Dr. Palaganas, be on the lookout for their coming podcast, DJ Simulationistas… ‘sup?, which will be available on the CMS Virtual Campus as well as iTunes and wherever podcasts are found.01_DJSim

In addition to their keynote, Dan, Janice, Roy Phitayakorn, and Denise Gee will also present the Interprofessional Debriefing Workshop at the Association for Surgical Education (ASE) 2017 Surgical Education. This event is the annual meeting of the Association for Surgical Education, and takes place from April 18 to April 22 in San Diego, California.

CMS Simulation Apprentice is the New Simulation Operations Manager at Maine Medical

IMG_4702 (003)The Center for Medical Simulation (CMS)  congratulates Mike Shepherd, former Operations Director at HealthSim United in Wichita, Kansas on becoming the new Simulation Operations Manager at Maine Medical Center. Mike started his new role this past Monday. Everyone here at CMS has fond memories of Mike from the time he spent a week here in September of 2012 as a Technical Apprentice. Since then we’ve kept in touch with Mike and were very excited to learn about his recent career move. Mike stopped to visit Tony Dancel, CMS’ Technical Director, during his recent move to Maine and shared with him the impact that Tony and the week he spent at CMS had on his career. Here’s what Mike wrote to Tony.

“When I began my simulation journey more than five years ago, I didn’t know anything or anyone in the simulation world. Tony was the first simulation professional from outside my region to recognize and acknowledge my potential. After a weeklong apprenticeship working alongside Tony and his staff, I returned home with new knowledge and more confidence. That allowed me to help successfully lead the creation of simulation programming and activities that had never before existed in my community. Fast-forward five years and I’m beginning a new position as the Simulation Operations Manager at Maine Medical Center in Portland. I do not believe this opportunity would have been possible if not for the foundation that was formed during my week at CMS. Tony is not only a wonderful colleague but an even better friend. I am grateful everyday to have had the opportunity to learn from Tony at CMS. I am even more grateful now to be his neighbor, just a few short miles up the road.”

Thanks for the kind words Mike and best of luck with your new position.

Founded in 1993, The Center for Medical Simulation (CMS) was one of the world’s first healthcare simulation centers and continues to be a global leader in the field. At CMS the focus is on communication, collaboration, and crisis management training in order to develop skills and teamwork behaviors that are best learned actively under realistic conditions. Since it first opened in 1993, CMS has trained thousands of participants in its innovative and challenging programs.

To learn more about CMS and its programs contact CMS at info@harvardmedsim.org

 

 

Dan Raemer shares ideas on interprofessional massive transfusion protocol simulation

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In response to a  recent post to the Society of Simulation in Healthcare’s Open Forum by Jill Mackey-Feist, Simulation Educator at Samaritan Health Services, asking to hear from others who had experience providing Massive Transfusion Simulations within a multidisciplinary team approach, CMS’ Dan Raemer responded:

We have been conducting massive transfusion cases in our simulations at the Center for Medical Simulation and Mass General Hospital for several years now.  The important components are (1) finding or making an appropriate surgical or OB model that simulates massive hemorrhage in a plausible manner, (2) involving everyone in the situation, and (3) insuring psychological and simulation safety.  We have mostly made our own models such as tumors that rapidly bleed with simulated blood as regulated from the control room.  The model must include several sources of bleeding that are difficult to reach surgically.  There are a number of “tricks” that can be used to ensure that the quantity of blood that appears in suction canisters and on lap-pads and drapes is enough to impress surgeons or obstetricians used to dealing with hemorrhage.  Sometimes this requires an enormous amount of blood!!  Having all of the typical resources (electrosurgery, balloon devices, hemostatic agents, blood warmers, etc.) to deal with blood loss readily available is important so as not to frustrate the participants.  We try to create cases where everyone is involved.  For example, having frequent phone calls with the blood bank about delays in providing blood, minor antibody issues, verification of ID can ensure that team communication issues will arise during the case and be discussed during a debriefing.  Third, we think it is important for psychological safety not to put the team into a situation where they feel that the massive hemorrhage  is a result of their incompetence.  We usually bring the team into a situation where someone (an actor), another surgeon or a trainee has gotten into trouble and has asked the team for help.  We almost always have the patient survive even if they have gone into PEA arrest from the hemorrhage.  As will all simulations, making sure that everything used, including the blood, is labeled “Not for Human Use, Simulation Only” is critically important.  Standardized waterproof labels can be obtained at Foundation for Healthcare Simulation Safety. I would be happy to discuss further if you would like to contact me directly.

Dan Raemer is the Chief Curiosity Officer at the Center for Medical Simulation, Boston, MA 02129 www.harvardmedsim.org .
Dan can be reached at dreamer@harvardmedsim.org or (617) 726-3193.

Founded in 1993, The Center for Medical Simulation (CMS) was one of the world’s first healthcare simulation centers and continues to be a global leader in the field. At CMS the focus is on communication, collaboration, and crisis management training in order to develop skills and teamwork behaviors that are best learned actively under realistic conditions. Since it first opened in 1993, CMS has trained thousands of participants in its innovative and challenging programs. Contact CMS at info@harvardmedsim.org

 

 

How to develop a dopamine addiction in feedback and debriefing? Astonishing answers are the drug!

JWR-Headshotsmile copyAstonishing responses from colleagues or learners in feedback conversations or debriefings are like crack cocaine for me… addictive.   Okay, I’ve never tried crack, but the “zing” of an unexpected response can also be quite a high.  The more often I hear things I did not know and could not foresee, the more addicted I get the little dopamine squirt of surprise.  I let myself depend on other people to teach me about themselves and what they are trying to accomplish. 

I start to crave the unique story behind each person’s actions.

So, when I heard the paradoxical phrase, “No was the yes I needed,” while listening to a podcast on Sunday, I pricked up my ears.  Boston chef/entrepreneur Barbara Lynch was explaining how she found her voice and path in the hard-driving kitchen of a mentor who yelled and ranted things like, “No! not like that!”   In an unexpected reversal, Lynch said, “because of the attention deficit disorder and the dyslexia, I couldn’t follow anyone’s formula at all. So “no” to me was the “yes” I needed to hear.”  “No” became the affirmation she needed to find her “Yes!” and do things her own way.

Check out her interview:

http://www.npr.org/2017/04/09/523170073/a-chefs-struggle-recounted-in-out-of-line

Jenny Rudolph is the Executive Director of the Center for Medical Simulation, Boston MA 02129, www.harvardmedsim.org
Founded in 1993, the Center for Medical Simulation (CMS) was one of the world’s first healthcare simulation centers and continues to be a global leader in the field. At CMS the focus is on communication, collaboration, and crisis management training in order to develop skills and teamwork behaviors that are best learned actively under realistic conditions. Since it first opened in 1993, CMS has trained thousands of participants in its innovative and challenging programs.

 

 

Healthcare Adventures in Australia!

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CMS held two of its Healthcare Adventures (HCA) workshops at Mater Education in Brisbane, Queensland, Australia last month. Mater is a CMS Affiliate, though the HCA workshop is available to all organizations, not just those in the affiliate program. Each workshop lasted two days, with the first running February 28th to March 1st, and the second running March 8th to March 9th.

The CMS team involved in these HCA workshops was made up of Robert Simon, Kate Morse, Mary Fey, Demian Szyld, and Jenny Rudolph.

One of the HCA workshops was attended by Mater “Stream Leaders,” and the second by their “Executive Council.” The Healthcare Adventures workshop creates simulations which are intended to open participants to transformational changes in their organizations and in their work life. Participants use these simulations to experience and debrief on how they react as a team, how leadership is determined in crisis situations, how to create an environment and culture where speaking up is encouraged and cultivated, and where staff feel safe speaking up and being transparent with each other.

The Mater team was interested in creating cultural change and embedding “Speaking Up” as a culture, hospital-wide. The workshop was also a jumping off point for having Mater leadership experience the concepts of simulation and “Debriefing with Good Judgment,” and showing how simulations can help people change the way they think.

The reaction from the Mater team was very positive. The faculty said their goal was to create the right balance of comfort and discomfort in the simulation experience in order to to foment change, and to get participants to reflect honestly on their interactions. When the team returned to Mater a week later, the Mater leadership team was excited to show us how they had implemented one of the systems from the HCA workshop, the “Learning Pathways Grid,” which they had printed up on a large board in their office space.

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The Healthcare Adventures workshop aims to move organizations from conventional to transformational modes.

Overall, the two workshops held at Mater Education were a great success, and we are very excited to continue bringing Healthcare Adventures to other hospital leaders and teams around the world!

 

 

HEALTHCARE ADVENTURES

Healthcare Adventures (HCA) are customized, intensive team-training workshops for leadership and management teams across the healthcare spectrum. Designed to improve individual and team performance by developing collaboration and communication, the HCA workshops use a simulated patient experience in a highly realistic clinical environment to highlight a team’s dynamics in a powerful, but non-threatening fashion. Non-clinicians actually get the chance to care for a patient and experience real-life issues first hand, and clinicians are challenged to think like healthcare administrators and executives!

CMS faculty and professional facilitators work with the team before the simulation, discussing objectives and expectations, and again after the simulation, identifying important interactions, key learnings and actionable strategies. This allows the group to turn learning into action immediately, by working on a real-world project with the help and support of the CMS facilitators. Depending on their needs, teams can draw variety of follow up support mechanisms and training to advance their learning and performance. Topics include teamwork, effective communication, resource management, performance enhancement and patient safety.

Workshops include:

  • Consultation between the team leader and a CMS facilitator prior to the workshop
  • Team pre-briefing on simulation objectives and strategies
  • Customized team challenge in the simulated clinical environment
  • Debriefing and discussion to identify important interactions and to develop actionable strategies for implementation
  • Facilitated work session to apply new strategies to an existing project (i.e., budget negotiations, product development, and pipeline strategy)
  • Report from CMS facilitator
  • Follow-up between the CMS facilitator and the team leader

For more information about Healthcare Adventures click here, or contact Gary Rossi, COO, at grossi@harvardmedsim.org

 

 

Jeff Cooper’s Letter to the Editor Provides Important Addendum to CRICO History

Jeffrey Cooper, PhD

On December 9, 2016, the journal Patient Safety & Quality in Healthcare published an article by Susan Carr, reflecting on the 40 years CRICO has served as malpractice insurance provider for Harvard medical institutions and their affiliate programs. (Full article: https://www.rmf.harvard.edu/About-CRICO/Media/In-the-News/News/2016/December/CRICO-Celebrates-40-Years-in-Patient-Safety)

On February 27, 2017, Jeff Cooper, Executive Director Emeritus of the Center for Medical Simulation, submitted a letter to the editors of Patient Safety & Quality in Healthcare, to address some critical pieces of the history of CRICO’s leadership in patient safety, which he felt were missing from the original article.

Thank you for giving visibility to the story of CRICO’s story of leadership in patient safety. It is worthy of praise and emulation. Yet, I think there are critical pieces of the story that perhaps space didn’t permit telling, although I think they are among the most important. Then again, I have a bias because I was there . . .

The other aspects of the CRICO patient safety story are important examples of how a forward-thinking insurance company can achieve a win-win-win-win (patient, provider, hospital, insurer). But, I believe it was the leadership of the HMS anesthesia Executive Committee that led to one of CRICO’s earliest and greatest successes, and that enabled the continued concentration on patient safety.

Dr. Cooper’s full letter, along with references, can be found at the Patient Safety & Quality in Healthcare website: http://www.psqh.com/analysis/letter-to-the-editor-cricos-patient-safety-leadership-a-missing-piece/

CMS Faculty Lead Four Courses at Australian Affiliates

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Center for Medical Simulation faculty, including Jenny Rudolph, Demian Szyld, Mary Fey, Walter Eppich, Julian van Dijk, Kate Morse, and Robert Simon trekked to Australia in February to help lead four sessions of CMS’ Simulation as a Teaching Tool courses.

Two courses took place at the Western Centre for Medical Education in Melbourne/St. Alban’s, Victoria, from February 14th to 17th and February 21st to 24th. Two took place at Mater Education in Brisbane, Queensland, from February 21st to 24th and from February 28th to March 3rd.

The Simulation as a Teaching Tool Simulation Instructor Workshop immerses healthcare simulation leaders and instructors in an inter-professional learning environment where participants learn to teach clinical, behavioral, and cognitive skills through simulation. This course draws from simulation-based pedagogy in field ranging from aviation to healthcare, psychology, experiential learning, and organizational behavior. Participants explore teaching methods that are applicable across the healthcare education spectrum, from undergraduate and graduate medical education to the nursing and allied health domains.

The day to day practice of the Simulation as a Teaching Tool course varies and includes simulation scenarios, lectures, small and large group discussions, and practical exercised on feedback and debriefing. The course also includes professional networking and events for sharing course and professional experiences.

Play “Simulation Go” at IMSH 2017 with #IMSHGo

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SIMULATION GO at IMSH 2017

The #1 point-getter will win a “DJ Simulationistas” vintage jacket!

The top 10 players will be entered into a random drawing to win CMS swag!

 

HOW TO PLAY:

1) Take photos of Simulationistas in the wild:

A photo of you being interviewed by the DJ Simulationistas team (Dan Raemer & Janice Palaganas) … 10 points

A photo of you at the CMS booth in the trade hall … 5 points

A photo of two CMS faculty or staff together … 3 points

A photo of three CMS course alumni together … 3 points

A photo of you at a workshop facilitated by CMS faculty … 2 points

A photo of CMS faculty running a workshop … 1 point

Follow CMS on Twitter or Instagram during IMSH 2017 … 1 point each

2) Send us the photo on Twitter (@MedSimulation) or Instagram (@centerformedicalsimulation) to earn points! Use #IMSHGo.

3) CMS will add up your points and post a leaderboard each night! Winners will be notified on Tuesday night.

The Center for Medical Simulation is at IMSH 2017 in Orlando!

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Please follow CMS on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook for additional IMSH updates.

www.twitter.com/medsimulation

www.instagram.com/centerformedicalsimulation

www.facebook.com/medicalsimulation

 

CMS faculty and staff will be facilitating or co-facilitating the following workshops. Please make sure to check the IMSH website (www.IMSH2017.com) for up to date room locations and times!

 

Monday 1/30:

10:00-11:30AM: Simulator Death: Controversial Learning Tool Benefits and Consequences

Faculty Development – Barrell Spring l

Speakers: Andrew Goldberg, MD; Jennifer L Arnold, MD, MSc; Sam DeMaria, MD; Daniel Lemke, MD; Adam I. Levine, MD; Dan Raemer, PhD; Jeron Zerillo, MD

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10:00-11:30AM: Strategies for Successful Co-debriefing

Debriefing –  Celebration 14 and 15

Speakers: Adam Cheng, MD, FRCPC, FAAP; Gavin Burgess; Helen Catena, RN; Amy Cripps, RRT; Jonathan Duff, MD; Walter Eppich, MD, MEd; Kristin Fraser, MD, FRCPC; Vincent Grant, MD, FRCPC; Michaela Kolbe, PhD; Janice C Palaganas, PhD, RN, NP, ANEF; Traci Robinson, RN; Stuart C Rose; Jenny W Rudolph, PhD

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11:45AM-1:15PM: Speed Mentoring: Formal Training, Masters & Certificate Affinity Group Networking Event

Interprofessional Education – Bayhill 17 and 18

Speakers: Ambrose H Wong, MD, MS-HPEd; Amanda V Crichlow, MD; Sharon Griswold, MD, MPH, CHSE; Tiffany Moadel, MD; Deborah D Navedo, PhD, CPNP, FNAP; Janice C Palaganas, PhD, RN, NP, ANEF; Rami Ahmed, DO, MHPE; Lillian Emlet, MD, MS; James A. Gordon, MD, MPA; Joseph O. Lopreiato, MD, MPH; Grace M. Ng, MS, CNM, RN, C-EFM; Vivienne Ng, MD, MPH; Thomas Nowicki, MD; Mary Anne Rizzolo, EdD, RN, FAAN, ANEF; Janet K Willhaus, PhD, RN, CHSE

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3:00-4:30PM: Improve Debriefing Skills Through Peer Observation and Feedback

Faculty Development –  Celebration 12 and 13

Speakers: Grace M. Ng, MS, CNM, RN, C-EFM; Emily Diederich, MD; Dawn Taylor Peterson, PhD; Laura Rock, MD; Jenny W Rudolph, PhD; Robert Simon, EdD; Demian Szyld, MD, EdM; Penni Watts, PhD, RN, CHSE-A

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3:00-4:30PM: Improve Clinical Feedback Skills Using the FACE (Feedback Assessment for Clinical Education)

Faculty Development – Celebration 1

Speakers: Rachel Onello, PhD, RN, CHSE, CNE, CNL; Melanie Barlow, RN, MN, GradDipCritCare, GradCertEd, CertIV; Emily Diederich, MD; Mary Fey, PhD, RN, CHSE; Jose M Maestre, MD, PhD; Rebecca D Minehart, M.D.; Janice C Palaganas, PhD, RN, NP, ANEF; Laura Rock, MD; Robert Simon, EdD

 

 

Tuesday 1/31

10:00-11:30AM: Build Your Simulation Training Program from Scratch

Speakers: Michelle Marie McLean, MD; Sidhant Nagrani, MD; Ambrose H Wong, MD; Antoinette Golden; Demian Szyld, MD, EdM; Rami Ahmed, DO, MHPE; Thomas Nowicki, MD; Kimberly Schertzer, MD

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10:00-11:30AM: Peer Role Play to Improve Debriefing

Debriefing – Blue Spring II

Speakers: Dr. Usamah Saleh Alzoraigi, MD; Abdulrahman Y Sabbagh, MD; Abdullah Almarshed, MD; Dr Shadi Almoziny; Abeer Arab, MBBS, FRCPC; Charles Pozner, MD; Jenny W Rudolph, PhD

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10:00-11:30AM: Debriefing the Debriefer: Take Faculty Development to the Next Level

Faculty Development – Bayhill 22

Speakers: Rachel Onello, PhD, RN, CHSE, CNE, CNL; Amy L Daniels, MS, RN, CHSE; Michaela Kolbe, PhD; Kristian Krogh, MD; Dawn Taylor Peterson, PhD; Penni Watts, PhD, RN, CHSE-A; Nelson Wong, MD

 

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3:00-4:30PM: Peer Coaching to Improve Debriefing Skills

Speakers: Adam Cheng, MD, FRCPC, FAAP; Wendy E Bissett, RN, CNE; Gavin Burgess; Helen Catena, RN; Jonathan Duff, MD; Walter Eppich, MD, MEd; Tobias Everett, MBChB FRCA; Vincent Grant, MD, FRCPC; James Lewis Huffman, BSc, MD, FRCPC; Michaela Kolbe, PhD; Traci Robinson, RN; Stuart C Rose; Demian Szyld, MD, EdM

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3-4:30p – Giving Feedback on Feedback

Faculty Development – Bayhill 29 and 30

Speakers: Roxane Gardner, MD, MPH, DSc; Ignacio Del Moral, MD, PhD; Mary Fey, PhD, RN, CHSE; Kate Morse, PhD, ARNP-BC, CRNP, CCRN, CNE; Rachel Onello, PhD, RN, CHSE, CNE, CNL; Janice C Palaganas, PhD, RN, NP, ANEF; Dan Raemer, PhD; Laura Rock, MD; Jenny W Rudolph, PhD; Robert Simon, EdD

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3:00-4:30PM: Learner Deception: What’s More Important, Protection or Realism?

Faculty Development – Barrell Spring I

Speakers: Andrew Goldberg, MD; Jennifer L Arnold, MD, MSc; Sam DeMaria, MD; Daniel Lemke, MD; Adam I Levine, MD; Dan Raemer, PhD 

 

Wednesday 2/1

8:30-10:00AM: Navigating a Career in Simulation

Speakers: Michelle Marie McLean, MD; Sidhant Nagrani, MD; Ambrose H Wong, MD; Sara M Hock, MD; Roxane Gardner, MD, MPH, DSc; Sharon Griswold, MD, MPH, CHSE; Mary E. Holtschneider, RN-BC, BSN, MEd, MPA, NREMT-P, CPLP; Deborah D Navedo, PhD, CPNP, FNAP; Demian Szyld, MD, EdM

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10:30-11:30AM: Role of Emotion in Simulation Learning

Debriefing – Bayhill 21

Speakers: Gabriel B Reedy, PhD, CPsychol; Laura Rock, MD

Jenny Rudolph Facilitates Workshop at Madigan Army Medical Center

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On November 9th and 10th, 2016, the Faculty Development Fellowship at Madigan Army Medical Center played host for the semi-annual Education and Leadership Workshop. The Center for Medical Simulation was honored to send Jenny Rudolph, Executive Director, to lead and facilitate teaching on creating respectful and honest feedback which reveals learner frames.

Over 100 medical educators and leaders from Madigan Army Medical Center, the local VA, and the Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, Idaho (WWAMI) network attended the Education and Leadership Workshop. Speaking at the conference were Colonel Michael Place, MD, hospital commander, on integrating principles of becoming a High Reliability Organization and Graduate Medical Education; Colonel Jessica Servey, MD, Uniformed Services University Faculty Development Educator, on Leaners in Trouble and the Educators Portfolio and Curriculum Vitae; and Major General Jeffrey Clark, MD, Director, Health Care Operations for the Defense Health Agency, on leadership lessons.

CMS was pleased to reconnect with alumni of its Comprehensive Instructor Workshop involved in the Faculty Development Fellowship, including the Program Director, Colonel Douglas Maurer, and fellows Major Heather O’Mara, Lieutenant Colonel Laurel Neff, and Lieutenant Commander Richard Thompson.

Pictured in photograph, from left to right, members of the Madigan Army Medical Center Faculty Development Fellowship: Col. Douglas Maurer, Program Director; Maj. Heather O’Mara, Fellow; Lt. Col. Laurel Neff, Fellow; Maj. Jeffrey Burket, Fellow; Capt. Mary Noel, Fellow; Maj. Michael Arnold, Fellow; Lt. Cmdr. Richard Thompson, Fellow.