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Posts Tagged ‘anesthesia’

Reflections on Two Months at CMS

Albert CollageAlbert Chan, MD, is an anesthesiologist and a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Medical Simulation.

“As I meandered down the hallways of the Center for Medical Simulation at the Navy Yard saying my final goodbyes, I could not help but marvel at the amazing intellectual journey the past nine weeks has taken me. Not only have I learned about the intricacies of medical simulation and education, I have gained completely new insights into myself.

When I first arrived at the CMS, it was a bit daunting as I did not know what to expect. I was at the very center of the simulation world, surrounded by experts in medical education. What will they think of me with my limited simulation experience? Will I be accepted by the staff and faculty? My concerns were alleviated in no time – in true CMS fashion, everyone embraced and welcomed me into the family and established the “safe container.” I was ready to become a learner once again.

There were many things that were impressive at the CMS – the flattened hierarchy, the openness of communication, the constant reflection and feedback to each other, the demand for improvement and excellence, the creativity of the sim techs (yes, Johnny Tsunami), the wealth of knowledge, the constant supply of soda (yes, it’s amazing). But if I had to pick one thing I learned the most from, it would undoubtedly be the Comprehensive Instructor Course.

I was fortunate enough to be both a participant in the course, as well as faculty observing from behind the scenes. I learned so much about the application of educational theories, the complexities of debriefing, and more about the adult learners’ mind. Not being a reflective person naturally, be it due to my culture or personality – the course has made me look within myself and explore my own psyche. I came to realize the frequent inferences and assumptions I have made about others in the past, and the effect it has had on communication and relationships. Being curious has taken on a whole new meaning.

The most remarkable thing was how the faculty and staff embodied the principles that they taught, and how the course was so carefully crafted and choreographed to center around the learners’ needs, and to build a strong sense of community among the participants. If I were to be a medical educator, that is exactly what I aspire to be.

“How can you just do simulation for such nine weeks? Doesn’t it get boring?” one of my good friends asked me. This notion did cross my mind before I came to CMS, but I was proven wrong. Medical simulation is not simply using mannequins to unnerve clinicians – it is an experiential and reflective process – as was my fellowship at the CMS. At the same time, I was able to personally witness the power of conversation – not only through practicing debriefing with good judgment in the courses, but also by talking to CMS faculty, staff, techs – I have truly expanded my horizons.

Harkening back to what Mary Fey said in the Instructor Courses, I have attained “threshold knowledge” – I cannot unlearn the knowledge I have acquired here. WTF forever means “What’s Their Frame?”, I shall always teach from a stance of curiosity, and assumptions is the mother of all [mistakes].

Thanks to all the faculty at the CMS who have given me the opportunity to join in the debriefings and provided me with valuable feedback, and thanks for sparing me some of their valuable time despite busy schedules to chat about my project – especially Jenny, Roxane, Jeff, Dan, Robert and Kate. And thanks to the awesome staff who hung out with me in the back all the time and have taught me so much – Johnny, Tony, Jenn, Matt, Emily and fellow visiting scholars! Hopefully we can maintain our relationships in the years to come!

Most importantly, have to thank my dear wife Christina for supporting me on this trip and helping me take care of the babies while I am at CMS! I know it must have been tough!

Looking up at the wall of the back debriefing room one last time as I walked out, “The Basic Assumption” has taken a completely different importance and meaning from nine weeks ago, and I hope that I can bring all that I have learned back home.”

–Albert Chan, MD

CMS faculty and colleagues publish findings on simulation for anesthesia education

Over the past several months, Center for Medical Simulation (CMS) Faculty and colleagues have published two articles on simulation for anesthesia education.

Using Simulation for Resident Assessment:  Center for Medical Simulation faculty member Rick Blum and Executive Director Jeff Cooper and colleagues Jack Boulet and Sharon Muret-Wagstaff report on the development and testing of simulation-based assessment for first year anesthesia residents.  The article entitled “Simulation-based Assessment to Identify Critical Gaps in Safe Anesthesia Resident Performance” is available here:
http://journals.lww.com/anesthesiology/Fulltext/2014/01000/Simulation_based_Assessment_to_Identify_Critical.29.aspx

Using Simulation to Improve Feedback to Residents: Center for Medical Simulation faculty members Rebecca Minehart, Jenny Rudolph, May-Pian Smith, and Dan Raemer report on their randomized, controlled trial to study the quality of anesthesia faculty feedback. The article entitled “Improving Faculty Feedback to Resident Trainees during a Simulated Case: A Randomized, Controlled Trial of an Educational Intervention” is available here::
http://journals.lww.com/anesthesiology/Abstract/2014/01000/Improving_Faculty_Feedback_to_Resident_Trainees.33.aspx

CMS’ Jeff Cooper, PhD, Receives ASA’s Highest Award

Jeffrey Cooper, PhDThe Center for Medical Simulation’s Executive Director, Jeff Cooper, was recently awarded the highest honor given by the American Society of Anesthesiologists, it’s Distinguished Service Award, for his lifetime contributions, especially for his efforts in making anesthesiology the leading specialty in patient safety at the ASA. He is the first non-physician to receive this award in its over 60 years. In Jeff’s honor, Dr. Paul Hickey,  announced that fund raising for two endowments has been initiated with the aim of supporting continuation of Jeff’s work both at Massachusetts General Hospital and the Center for Medical Simulation. Dr. Hickey also announced a contribution of $100,000 from the Children’s Hospital Anesthesia Foundation as the kick off for the CMS endowment.

ASA News Release on Dr. Cooper

Dr. Cooper receiving the Distinguished Service Award at the American Society of Anesthesiologists in San Francisco, October 2013:

 

CMS Announces New ACRM/MOCA Part IV Workshops for 2011 and 2012

Crisis Management Training for Practicing Anesthesiologists
Tuition: $1500
Meets the MOCA® Part IV Simulation Requirement

The Center for Medical Simulation (CMS) is offering intensive one day workshops in Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management (ACRM) for all anesthesiologists that will meet the MOCA® Part IV simulation requirement. These workshops have been approved for 7.5 AMA PRA Category 1 continuing education credits and are also eligible for Risk Management Study.

CMS Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management workshops are designed for those anesthesiologists seeking to practice their skills in managing critical events. The overall focus of these workshops is on learning the type of teamwork and generic skills needed when managing any kind of infrequent but critical event in anesthesia and opportunities will be made available to learn skills in managing certain specific events. During the workshops, participants requiring MOCA® certification will each have a turn as the primary anesthesiologist caring for the patient.

The Center for Medical Simulation is an endorsed program in the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Simulation Education Network, and has ensured that this workshop complies with the American Board of Anesthesiologists’ Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesia MOCA® Part IV simulation requirements. MOCA® is a registered certification mark of The American Board of Anesthesiology, Inc.

Schedule September 2011 – June 2012

September 8, 19, 22
October 6, 27, 31
November 3, 21, 28
December 5, 8, 12, 19
January 5, 9, 19, 23
February 6, 9, 13, 27
March 5, 19, 22, 26
April 9, 23
May 7, 10, 21
June 4, 7, 11

Additional Saturday and weekday courses may be scheduled pending demand. CMS welcome entire teams from your group by special arrangement . 

View Workshop PDF

Click here to Apply for this Workshop

Latest Round of the Harvard Anesthesia Resident Performance Assessment Group Study (HARPAG) Completed on Friday at CMS

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Finished up the latest round of the Harvard Anesthesia Resident Performance Assessment Group Study (HARPAG) on Friday at CMS.

Dr Rick Blum, an Anesthesiologsit from Children’s Hospital Boston, is the Prinicpal Investigator of the HARPAG study whose aim is to improve patient safety by building on an ongoing pilot research study to develop an effective, credible, ongoing, simulation enabled assessment to more reliably identify anesthesia residents at an early stage of training who may
ot have attained sufficient skills. Rick believes that early intervention is more likely to have a positive impact on attaining proficiency or directing residents toward another specialty with the goal of ensuring that no underperforming resident graduates from a residency program.

CMS Schedules MOCA Workshops for 2011

Meet the MOCA® Part IV Simulation Requirements and Receive  7.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Continuing Education Credits 
  
The Center for Medical Simulation (CMS) has scheduled twenty Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management (ACRM) Workshops for the first half of 2011. These intensive one day workshops meet the MOCA® Part IV simulation requirement and have been approved for 7.5 AMA PRA Category 1 continuing education credits. They are also eligible for Risk Management Study. The tuition is $1,500. 
 
Additional Saturday and weekday courses may be scheduled pending demand. CMS welcomes entire teams from your group by special arrangement. To register and to learn more about CMS’ Anesthesia Crisis Management Training course, go to the CMS website, or contact CMS at
info@harvardmedsim.org. Click here for a PDF describing the workshop.

The Center for Medical Simulation is an endorsed program in the American Society of Anesthesiologists’ Simulation Education Network, and has ensured that this workshop complies with the American Board of Anesthesiologists’ Maintenance of Certification in Anesthesia MOCA® Part IV simulation requirements. MOCA® is a registered certification mark of The American Board of Anesthesiology, Inc. 
     
CMS Anesthesia Crisis Resource Management workshops are designed for those anesthesiologists seeking to practice their skills in managing critical events. The overall focus of these workshops is on learning the type of teamwork and generic skills needed when managing any kind of infrequent but critical event in anesthesia and opportunities will be made available to learn skills in managing certain specific events. During the workshops, participants requiring MOCA® certification will each have a turn as the primary anesthesiologist caring for the patient. CMS ACRM WORKSHOP  – Meets MOCA® Part IV Simulation Requirement
Special thanks to Atomic newsletter service, who took care of the newsletter distribution announcing the workshops

TUITION: $1,500 per attendee 

SCHEDULE – February through June, 2011
February 7, 10, 14, 24, 28
March 7, 10, 14, 21, 24
April 4, 7, 11, 25
May 9, 16, 21, 26
June 2, 6